Summer Is For Announcements

It’s been over a month now since we signed off for the academic year and we have something to share with you all. This week, we announced our newest book Reading for the Field became available for purchase through our publisher and amazon. We’re very excited to share it with you all.

PE should be the easiest class to be with peers, even if ones ability is not nearly as exact as some others. However, with today’s standards, PE is so much more than an activity based class. Some classes will venture into taking notes for understanding human anatomy or rules of games. Sometimes, certain activities have scoring rules. And other times, because weather prevents safe use of the PE areas, students will be indoors exploring aspects of a sport or activity that would not be otherwise explained to the class.

Through several units of activity, Reading for the Field looks at not only equipment that may be used by the activity, but how to use the equipment and why that equipment may be there. Using real pictures taken over three years, users of Reading for the Field can see the differences in set up for equipment and utilize reminders to help improve cooperative gameplay.

All the units are short and focused to get at highlights of information to the student. The book is primarily driven for PE units but can also be used by students in ELA classes. Included in this book after every unit is a selection of comprehension questions based on the reading and experience that a student may participate in.

We’re very excited to bring this book to our followers and hope you find it is very useful.

While we’re here: we owe a great deal of gratitude to Danielle Dauenhauer for being willing to get up early one morning and supply us with the softball gear photos that we were so sorely missing.

In Summary

The list of books published by ParaEducate include:

ParaEducate

Finding It In the World Level 2 Second Edition

Just the Words: World Geography

Just the Words: Science Level 1 and 2

Just the Words: Government

The Bard In Stick Figures

Reading for the Field

Other summer things

We’ve been planning all summer for our blog this year. We’ve got a line up we really hope will be useful in the upcoming months. Part of the series we’re looking at is due to the fact that it’s been six years since we started the original outline for ParaEducate. It still is our number one selling book and we’re proud to extend the book’s direction through the blog.

In case you’re wondering what we actually are thinking about: strategies for technology, understanding Health classes, professional limits, and more class specific strategies.

If you missed it, six years ago on June 24th, Renay approached Megan about writing a book for paraeducators. As legend has it, Megan didn’t quite believe Renay until in her email the outline showed up. A five hour session at a local sandwich shop later, the first draft was finalized and then the next six months were about refining and preparing a book for publication.

Future publication

We’re still slowly getting through some major illustrations for three upcoming books. Due to the nature of these books, they are quite demanding. We are looking at books that can help with math, English, history, and science right now and have plans over the next few years to finish and release the books. We’re also still preparing more single use materials for our teacherspayteachers and our teachersnotebook store.

What is Renay actually doing this summer?

Renay will have a whole blog dedicated to this probably in October. It’s a huge professional step, and one she is currently enjoying. Stay tuned!

One more thing while we have you here

We return for regular postings August 17. Until then, relax, try not to think about the upcoming school year, and maybe look at the school supply sales once or twice. We’ll see you in August.


ParaEducate returns August 17, 2017 for the new academic year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations

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We Know The Way (To End A Year)

 

It’s been an incredible year for ParaEducate and we love sharing our year with you. Our yearly blog started on August 18, 2016.

And all of that brings us to today. Our last blog of the year.

One of our little secrets: we honestly don’t actively procrastinate with our posts, though a few were assembled much later than we prefer this year. We actively check not just social media but our colleagues in other districts to find out what might need to be addressed. We know if one person is experiencing a specific event, that someone else somewhere is also experiencing the behavior, the loneliness, and the struggles of working in a nebulous field.

We enjoy celebrating the events that happen for all paraeducators. And we know that campuses are all celebrating and we encourage you to be a part of the festivities. We ask administrators and PTAs to remember that everyone in a school is a part of the community that is geared to help all students learn.


One more thing before we officially sign off for the 2016-2017 school year, firstly, we anticipate our 2017-2018 blog will begin August 17th. We have a new book heading into the publishers and we will let you know when that is available.

We would also like to thank our readers for this incredible year. We can’t wait to see you in August.


ParaEducate returns August 17, 2017 for the new academic year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations

Posted in #BetterTogether, #kindness, 8 hours, Adminstrators, Behavior Strategies, blog, Campus, Conferences, death, Disabilities, End of the Year, General Education Teachers, ParaEducate, paraeducators, publications, Special Education Teachers, Students | Comments Off on We Know The Way (To End A Year)

The Balance of Behaviors

The end of the year is sort of a mixed time for many students. There are happy things that cause excitement and there are things that may cause anxiety or disruptive behaviors.

Hopefully, you have stashed away a consistent behavior expectation all year and you can remind the students you work with what you expect as the excitement runs through in waves in the final days of school.

Even if you haven’t there are days you may feel you’re just going to be the iron fortress of discipline. Infractions are caught and handled regularly just as they had any other time during the year. There is more exasperation though because no matter what, the student has heard the rules all year long.

There is, however, middle ground. Strive for accepting that there are unusual schedules that excite students and frighten others. Strive for remembering that the rules of the day are still needed to be enforced, but there are limits to enforcement.

  1. Recognize your own day long rhythms. Are you cranky closer to lunch because you haven’t taken a fifteen-minute break? Do you get sleepy after lunch? Students being a little rambunctious at this point usually cause most to be irritable and you’re responding to the situation.
  2. Dress code taking up most of your attention? By itself: dress code is a loaded gun, we’ll talk about all of dress code later. But if you feel like you are the only person enforcing, take a step back for a moment. You may just be. And yes, rules are rules, but the end of the day, the dress code enforcement may not be the challenge to push back on. In most cases, by this point in the year, most students who are violating school dress code are probably doing so regularly and the administration is addressing it.
  3. The student who are afraid of schedule changes, make sure you have a visual schedule for all days during the week, to lessen the challenges that are related to uncertainty. Having an out of a favorite activity for a break is usually key.
  4. For students who are afraid of schedule changes that cannot pull off a visual schedule or who refuse a visual schedule, explain the upcoming event. If you can anticipate loud noises, other student excitements, or what may happen at the special event, this is a good way to prepare the student for what may come.

No one wants to be the ultimate disciplinarian especially at the end of the year. Tempering the challenges with the demands of the day-to-day work helps the most. There are many things that are utterly fun for students and there are some things that are some of the focus of the end of the year. It can seem like an endless line of


ParaEducate ends on May 25th for the 2017 academic year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

 

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Rise

The countdown is on the board. And for some campuses, the days are under ten days left in the year, others are just under twenty.

The unique things about the end of the year, students are getting the processes that have been asked of them all year. And a few students who you might not have imagined getting to this point in the academic year are overcoming challenges you were pretty certain at the beginning of the year you wouldn’t have imagined trying back in September. Being flexible with a different schedule. Walking a different way to class, staying with the class instead of running outside, addressing peers by name, reaching a little further to stretch to get an object they want, presenting in class, or reading out loud in class, many students have made great strides in their academic, social, and emotional progress.

Additionally, you rose as a professional. You were calm when the situation was frantic. You know how to navigate the difference between avoidance behaviors and honest trouble the student is experiencing. You can navigate the halls during busy times, you know how to run out of class silently and grab a bathroom break, and you know how to get help for a situation and not feel embarrassed about needing help.

If you really think about the changes all the students and staff encounter in an academic year, it’s rather daunting really. At the beginning of the year a social contract of “We will take the student and they will learn..” what that ‘learn’ is can be debatable, some learn life lessons, others learn smaller incremental lessons that may not be remembered due to the nature of their disability. By the end of the year, though the learning looks different for every student, somethings have caused growth. And no one can take that away.


While I have you here…

We are preparing a book for publication to be released this summer. While the material has not yet been sent to the publishers, we do know that it is potentially very useful to many folks. We can’t wait to share the release of this book with you.

ParaEducate will sign off for the 2016-2017 academic year on May 25th.


ParaEducate ends on May 25th for the 2017 academic year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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The Beginning of the End

Tidbits of the End of the Year

The end of the year is upon us. Ready or not, the calendar is coming to an end; the number of days of instruction is countable. Should you panic? Should you try and get every piece of work done possible? Should you just give in and just relax?

It’s a combination of all of the above. Reinforce positive behaviors, be clear about expectations, take challenges one at a time, and remember the good times.

Reflecting on Testing

Sometimes its not fun at all watching students take these tests. Especially the student who is able to sit and attend the test but not understand anything being asked to them on the test. But it is a lesson in perseverance. Even when it’s the sixteenth hour of sitting in a testing room with that student on the same test.

About high standards for some students

There is that pocket of student that can act, walk, and speak as if nothing in the world matters. They’re hiding a pretty severe disability. They shove away help in public. And you’re conscious about the interventions you may have to provide, but there’s nothing you can do to break the behavior of refusals, the rudeness, the challenges that academics provide because they are about saving face.

Spend time getting to know this student, especially in classes where they feel successful. Realize that at the end of the year, there are so many events that may cause social anxiety and be upfront with this student about the things that are happening. Be consistent and realize that small in roads are worth the little battles. In the mean time, take each moment with a small breath. It’s not you, they’re trying to protect themselves.

Be ready to say ‘good-bye’

The end of the year is one of those times when many changes happen. Even if you don’t like ‘good-bye’, there are folks who are retiring or leaving for other positions. Celebrate the things they contributed the entire time you worked together.

Speaking of professionals

Remember the professional part of professional. This is a time of year when people tend to be more sensitive. Forgetting ‘please’ , ‘thank you’, or confidentiality of students is all too easy when you think students might be otherwise occupied.

The end of the year is upon us. Whether or not we are ready, it’s going to take all we can do to get there and make sure we do it together and in one piece.


ParaEducate ends on May 25th for the 2017 academic year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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EdRev and Who Really Is Professional?

We went to EdRevSF this last weekend. Mostly to meet the awesome Amanda Morin of Understood.org. If you’ve never visited Understood, they are a great resource for folks who have children or students with learning disabilities, ADHD, dyslexia, or dysgraphia. They also offer a weekly chat about all sorts of topics related to specific strategies to use with students with these disabilities through a podcast and a Twitter chat (@Understoodchat).

So some things we saw there… First of all, EdRev is incredibly family friendly. Children under twelve are free and there were a variety of activities on the day of EdRev allowing children and families to experience the ball field at AT&T park. There were many vendors and education opportunities for students with the variety of disabilities that were highlighted at this event.

We enjoyed listening to Shelley Haven and her “Technology Tools for Diverse Learners” presentation at 9 am. She shared her information about different technology that would all be previewed later by different vendors at the Technology Preview. She separated all the technology into categories. The following devices/add ons we found the most interesting:

  • Read & Write for Google
  • Snap & Read Universal (for Chrome)
    • Converts text to speech, highlight web and copy to cite sources
  • G(Math) is now “equaiO”
    • Speed math equation and chemistry formula
    • No vertical or stacked math
  • TactScreen
    • screen for sensory feedback on a tablet or phone
  • Sonocent Audio Notetaker
    • Bundle slides, audio, and notes
  • DropTask:
    • Graphic task management

After Shelley, we went out to the Keynote event. Some of the keynote is introducing the event that led up to EdRev: RevUp for students with learning disabilities where the group taps into the unique abilities of people with learning disabilities and encouraging that all the things they struggle against while in school to use and make good use of the talents and gifts that come with having a brain that works differently than most other folks.

After the keynote, there was only time to attend two sessions, we chose “Collaboration is the Key to Success: How to Establish and Sustain Effective Relationships with our Children’s Team” with Jessica Corrine and “Story of Self: How and When to Tell Your Story” Luke Hayes (from Understood.org).

Jessica’s session was filled with interesting insights into how different people approach issues and how to be more welcoming, especially at the IEP table. Taking a survey in the middle addressing personality types was a fun activity.

Luke Hayes led his session through an exercise in learning how to tell a personal story. Of most relevance because the importance of understanding the story of how someone understands themselves or a part of their life is a life long process, that the story itself has a chance to enrich and change the mind of people through the direct honesties of the elements of self-story.

EdRev was an adventure. There are many things that could potentially happen and it is a young conference with lots of potential. While ParaEducate was not a partner nor slated to speak at this event, we had a few physical takeaways about the movement of folks in the Learning disability community and have high hopes for many people who spoke and the drive to help make certain that appropriate supports are given to students with learning disabilities so they can better be prepared for life after high school, whatever path that may take.

While I have you here:

Something came across our attention this week and it’s been eating at us. There is a natural fact that most paraeducators are not given any sort of certificate declaring themselves as competent paraeducators. Most paraeducators aren’t often college educated either. However, saying all of this—paraeducators are the most likely informed on the job and care about the job they have and reaching the students they have. This does not mean they are not qualified individuals to support any student, regardless of need.

There is a certain amount of irony in the idea of inclusion does not mean certain individuals on a school campus. A paraeducator  is a person who sees a variety of behaviors every day, deals with students with and without disabilities, and works with hundreds of students over the course of a day. Simply because they may have learned through the classroom and expectations in a less than ideal manner does not dampen the contributions they may have to a school or a student.


Next week, we start our End of Year Series, we are literally four weeks away from ending our blog for the 2016-2017 academic year. Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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Ways to Widen the Circle

We actually thought that a few weeks ago when we looked at the circle of influences that we needed to reach out, we might return to the topic and keep talking about ways that connecting to other education folks, even those at your same campus would be talked about on and off, but not this soon honestly.

One of the things that gets ignored in special education, and especially by paraeducators who have contracts that run just during the school day, the limits of contact to the working hours of the school day. But we’ve said this time and time again: those informal meetings after school and those that occur off campus are equally important.

Teacher assigned potluck for the class? Participate, maybe you’ll skip the paragraph describing the dish, but you’re on the hook to bring in something to help the class out. If you’re on a tight budget, helping out with napkins or paper plates, or maybe even a bag of chips helps yield things along.

You know those crazy flash mob dances? Yes, the one that was circulating in the email for two weeks. That one. Participate. Meet teachers you normally don’t speak with.

Take notes. Not just in the style you prefer, but if you need to, learn Cornel Note Format (and the style can honestly vary for specific subjects like Music, Math, and PE!)

Read the books from the Battle of the Books during the Battle season. Yes, some are easy books, but to the students, seeing another adult choosing to read the books as a free read is rather interesting to them.

Be willing to speak to parents. This is a double edge sword, but here are a few rules to follow on this: always stay positive, ask the parent how they are doing, and remember that the parent wants what is best for the student.

Be a participant in your school community. Help out on volunteer days if you’ve got a few hours. Go to the school talent show. Participate where you can. Doing so shows you are invested in the students, the climate of the campus, and the outcomes.

You’re modeling behavior expectations for long term of all students. While this is surprising and most students only see the end result, they do get to value that you’re working within the spheres that they too are experiencing. Teachers notice that you care and are willing to be a part of the activities. You’ll find yourself being respected a little more because your actions are mirroring your words.

Not only does it make those hard days easier when you have a colleague to speak to, it means you can gain allies when a student has trouble or someone else to help talk to a student when they’re upset about something that is going on in their life (both personal and school related).

We do recognize that every paraeducator’s career is very different, some are in the job for a few weeks, and others for nearly a life time, and all of these modeling for students, parents, and your colleagues can often make you feel very lonely, sometimes even lonelier if you’re the only paraeducator on your site, but it’s about not being lonely and being willing to invest in being present in the year you are a part of. One last piece of advice though: be genuine in your commitment. If you cannot make something be honest with yourself about that. You’re going to miss some Friday mixers after work and you may have family obligations.

And if you’re wondering: yes, there may be YouTube of Renay participating in a special school event very shortly. We’ll let you know.

While we have you here…

Speaking of widening circles, Renay is heading this weekend to EdRevsf. While she is not a speaker at this event, she’ll be there passing out at least information cards. We look forward to meeting new folks and learning what can be shared. See you there!


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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No Really, It Doesn’t Need to Be All Done

In the flurry of projects that get hurled at students this time of year, it’s a good reminder: it’s just school and it doesn’t need to get all done. For years we’ve discussed modifying curriculum and adaptations. But what if the student still doesn’t do it when it’s modified or adapted?

  1. There may be a good reason why: no support at home for homework. Even activities like coloring a map does not always mean it will get done. Families of students with disabilities may have additional therapies or have socio-economic stressors limiting completion of work. Additionally, families with students with disabilities just want time at home to be a family and sometimes that family time is not just homework time even if they may have other children who do not have a disability.
  2. The material is still too high for the student to participate without significant support. While a good goal is independence, sometimes a student may still be learning to read or identifying numbers. The student may not be able to access additional materials or understand all the words of a video they watched online.
  3. It honestly isn’t that important. The number of paraeducators who look at Renay with pure shock when she says that the assignment isn’t important even though it may be half of the student’s final grade means the phrase doesn’t register. Many students are honestly emotionally fragile for a variety of reasons. If you work with students who have behaviors, identified as emotionally disturbed, or other reasons, you may not be able to access the reasons, school at this moment is not the goal. That intervention for the repetitive behavior is more important. Stopping the self-harm is more important. Making certain the student is safe at home is more important.
  4. The student’s inability to complete a modified or adapted assignment is not a reflection of your work. Your job is to help the student with access, not to work them beyond their abilities. Certainly, the student needs to try, and that can be evident especially at this time of the year.
  5. Passing the responsibility to study hall or the tutor may not yield any more results. Some students and their disabilities make after school time or later times in the day may result in more inability to get things done.
  6. Doing the activity assigned by the general education teacher may not be the best representation of the student’s learning.
  7. The student has the right to fail. This part gets caught up in a lot of arguing, but sometimes, students make a conscious choice, even students with disabilities. Whether it’s going with social image, burn out, or not caring, the student’s work is still the student’s work. If you removed the paraeducator from the equation, how much of a difference would the nagging have made to the student to attempt the work? None?

It’s hard to see someone ignore something as important as their own education. But all those little pieces may sometimes be just parts of the life that makes up a student. It does snowball, but learning these lessons now before a student gets out into the world beyond traditional schooling is important.


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

 

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Widening the Circle

Last week, we took advantage of our week off to have meetings with folks from all over the globe. Two things are still in progress, but one of the conversations we had had us go speak to a professor we know to clarify something for us.

It wasn’t that one of our conversations went awry. It was just the curious factor that here was this researcher trying to learn information about a very specific special education topic: modified curriculum, something we do specialize in, and they had no idea about connecting with special education professors. And the Professor pointed out to us, that as professionals we look to find where we belong and we forget about making connections.
And that was our little light bulb moment for the week. “Of course!” we reasoned. While academia seems to suffer from this, but teachers and paraeducators do as well. Sometimes it’s just about survival, focusing on helping a student manage a set of behaviors and learn skills to cope. Other times, it’s just about the nature of schools and teaching, that widening the circle isn’t as easy as one might think surrounded by teachers.

This also reminds us about the power of #BetterTogether, a collection of folks who have either been/are a parent of a person with a disability, a professional who works with people with disabilities, a person with a disability, or a combination. #BetterTogether was created to pool resources and help reach folks and get the word out about inclusive education as a whole. Find out more and why social media is the vehicle for all of us on #BetterTogether. If you don’t use Facebook, find us on Twitter.

But how do you go about getting the circle to widen? Sometimes it takes a little bribery. We suggest chocolate chip cookies personally, but some folks its donuts or even coffee. The circle getting bigger also helps educate folks about disabilities, helps to get information to others who may not know how to start asking, and most of all, reminds everyone that we are a community.

National Paraeducator’s Day April 2

Every year, April 2 is National Paraeducator’s Day. It’s been four days, since, but we would be remiss if we did not mention that every day hard working paraeducators are helping to foster: a love of learning, independence, and all sorts of support. Paraeducators do not exclusively work with students with disabilities. Some work with students who are learning English as a second language, some still help work with students who have other needs.

Thank a paraeducator for the work they do. It’s not a token of appreciation, all that matters really, “Thank you for the work you’re doing.” Acknowledging that you see the challenges and successes they see along side you matters the most day in and day out.

April is Autism Acceptance Month

But wait…we know the question you have and the answer depends on which organization or individuals you follow, April is Autism Acceptance Month.

Why acceptance? Because Autism is here, and people with autism as a disability are learning to navigate the world we know it along side with people without autism. Some folks with autism are going to have success in different ways and all successes for everyone matters.

We’re going to work on widening our circle. It’s more than just being friendly.


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #BetterTogether, 8 hours, Autism, Behavior Strategies, Disabilities, Modifications, National Paraeducator's Day, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Students | 1 Comment

Where To Put Your Worries

It goes without saying, special education is unlike a lot of jobs. There’s a lot of moving pieces and not all the moving pieces move at the same rates in the same direction.

And the student you just saw happy a week ago is now a little less motivated to do anything. And while you’re trying to get him motivated and interested in school for the time being, in the back of your mind, you’re reviewing what you know about the student.

The list of reasons to worry isn’t very long:

  • What family member was just released from jail?
  • Do they have electricity and running water at home right now?
  • Do they have food at home?
  • Are they safe at home?
  • Are they able to get home safely?
  • Did the parents pay this month’s rent?

And you know the student may not be forthcoming with you, even when you have everything you need to know.

You know that list of students, and it doesn’t change. It amplifies when a sibling comes to campus and you know there is that additional worry that shows up.

But what do you do?

  • You let administration know
  • You keep honest tabs on the student
  • You ask direct questions to the student with another trusted adult present
  • You fill out the mandated reporter forms and file them with the correct person(s)

And after, you have weeks of not knowing if the message was understood. You worry a lot until then. Some folks pray, and that may be enough. Other folks get therapy and learn to understand boundaries and their relationships with others. And finally, one of the best suggestions Renay ever received was to honestly write down every worry every night. Very simply acknowledge all the things that are out of control that you wish you could make better. Whether this is a formal journal, or little slips of paper you leave in a box for the world to find later.

Not everything is simple in life. And leaving can be hard at the end of the day with these worries that follow you around. Sometimes you don’t know what will await you when you return. And you’re just going to have to believe, even the most pessimistic among us, that things can get better, and get better especially for the students. But ultimately, having a strategy to let all these parts go can help with the worries at the end of the day.


ParaEducate will be off next week for spring break. But fear not! We will return on April 6. Enjoy the week off whenever spring break comes you way.


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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