With Your Head on a Swivel

The academic year is in full swing now. There’s no denying that routines have been established. And yet, due to a variety of reasons, mostly stemming from a student’s collection of disabilities, the routines still seem to be a puzzle.

It’s enough to have a person supporting a student, encouraging their independence, and watching them make progress put their head through the wall.

So, firstly, don’t put your head through the wall. Patch work isn’t that much fun really and you never know when the wall at school houses an electrical line or concrete masonry units on the other side.

Some coping strategies:

  • You know those deep breathing techniques you teach your students, use them for yourself. They work.
  • Redirect to the general education teacher, get the teacher to re-enforce routines with the students
  • Use a visual schedule. Remind the student of the things they need, activities they take part in. It’s okay to direct the student to the correct page in the notebook as long as they’ve taken the notebook out.
  • Remember you’re planning for the long game here and shaping behaviors over the short term to help a student develop skills to be successful over the entire year.
  • It’s just school. Certainly there’s developing all sorts of skills, but in the end, this is just part of a student’s day and just a part of their lives. Sometimes there are other things that are just more important.

Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in 8 hours, Behavior Strategies, Campus, Classroom, Disabilities, Disabilities, General Education Teachers, paraeducators, Students | Leave a comment

Overreliance?

ParaEducate pretty much lives on Facebook. Other social media outlets do have our attention, but not quite as much as Facebook. And sometimes, the ads that are sent to us are rather startling. The most recent one was an ad asking for folks looking to complain about overreliance on paraeducators.

We’ve seen quite a few instances in our career of overreliance. Evidence is shown in those perfect art projects in elementary school, accurately presented material in secondary, students who are never allowed to “fail”, however one might define ‘fail’. Students who never experience peer interaction and students who never really know their general education teacher, the fun activities at school, or the principal. Experiences that are allowed to every other student.

But what are paraeducators then actually for when you look at these moments that happen even at the most inclusive schools?

Paraeducators are for implementing the general education teacher’s or the special education teacher’s plans.

Paraeducators are for supporting students with their health needs, social skills, and bolstering academic skills.

Paraeducators are for supporting teachers in understanding students with their disabilities and with their particular needs.

Paraeducators are extra eyes in a classroom, but not always the eyes that will turn around and discipline on campus.

Paraeducators are aware of deadlines and try to help a student get there, but aren’t dying when the student doesn’t complete all of the assignment even with support.

And finally, paraeducators and teachers are a team supporting a student in their growth for the year.

How best to give a student opportunities to be a member of their school or classroom? Step away. Even for the student who needs you to be within five feet. Getting a perspective across the classroom may give you a better idea of what a student may be seeing or being annoyed by. Giving physical space gives trust to the student to try a skill before asking for help or teaching a student how to ask for help and accept help from someone other than you. Getting a chance for a student to learn from their classmates. Giving a student a chance to enjoy music day or a school concert. Give them a chance, even if you have to sit next to them half way through the event. Give them a chance to learn from the things they need to learn from. Give them the space to make mistakes and grow from that mistake.


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #BetterTogether, 8 hours, Begining of the Year, Campus, Classroom, Disabilities, General Education Teachers, paraeducators, Special Education Teachers, Students, training | Leave a comment

The Things That Excite Us

It’s still the beginning of the year; some of the last schools have just started this week. It doesn’t matter though; we’ve seen a lot of things already that excite us on different campuses.

  • The student who everyone wants to work with. You see classmates run to join this student when it is time for group work.
  • You find the student who was a quiet, non-verbal student, reaching out and making connections with staff and peers.
  • You find students reaching out and making tentative friendships.
  • You see the general education teacher excited about helping that student learn to do the skill that they’ve never mastered but their entire class has.
  • The campus security is taking time out to help get to know the students and is genuinely concerned for their welfare, helping them get into their locker when the maze of students has died down.

These are just a sampling of little moments in the beginning of the school year. These moments will sustain you when the things aren’t nearly filled as much with those fun memories.


In a side tangent: it is National Suicide Prevention Week. In light of last week, we’d like to remind everyone that the hotline to talk any time of the day is: 1-800-263-TALK (8255).


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

 

Posted in #BetterTogether, Begining of the Year, Campus, Classroom, Disabilities, General Education Teachers, Group Work, Students | Comments Off on The Things That Excite Us

I Open At The Close

Other than prescribing to a few themes for certain times of year, our blog posts for ParaEducate are most definitely organic and spontaneous when compared to other blog postings and blog organizations as we have been heavily influenced by life in the trenches showing the growth inclusion provides to all students, staff, and teachers at inclusive campuses.

This is not an easy topic for many, including Renay. So if you are sensitive to the topic of death, maybe come around to reading this blog post another time. But, due to the nature of things that have recently happened, we decided that we needed to talk about it. Continue reading

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Better Go And Get Your Armor…

School started for Renay on Wednesday with the students arriving at 8:30 in the morning. Like the start of every year, and probably especially for those who are veterans, there are lingering memories of students who were just there only three months ago, some fond, some not quite as fond. There are familiar faces, maybe just a little older than they looked in your head when you first met them. And most importantly, there are the new faces of new students.

Even though there was a meeting before the school year officially started, descriptions of the new students may only share a partial picture of expectations of a student, their abilities, or even medical changes. Those first days are so focused on trying to get to know folks, catch up on the summer, and just falling into a pattern that will be the most useful for everyone. It’s quite a learning curve, no matter how many times a specific student may have been “the new student” or how old a student may actually be.

And more distressing are the students who give you no signs of being welcomed to campus. The ones that will fight you tooth and nail over every little hill. Some give you at least twenty minutes, others go right for the tender spots hoping to get a reaction right away. These behaviors are sometimes very distressing, especially within hours of their arrival on campus. It exhausts staff who work with the student, in some cases, especially a student who is quite capable of reaching the requests that a general education teacher asks of the class, makes it very difficult to find a way to appreciate the student and their skills.

The phrases the student uses also sometimes sends a veteran alarms.

  • “I’m stupid.”
  • “I don’t have to listen to you.”
  • “You’re dumb.”

There’s the body language.

  • Posturing to gain attention.
  • The snicker when they think no one was looking.
  • Threatening adults, especially adults in authority
  • Trying to “split” two different staff or case managers

Here’s what you need to do for a minute: with the new student, realize you’re laying the groundwork. Hopefully by the end of the year you’ll have a student who at least trusts you, and realizing your authority is in their best interest. Testing boundaries is part of every student’s career. For a student with a disability there are more folks who come into contact with the student, thusly more people in authority to push against.

What can you do:

  • Be consistent. Be there for that student, even when they’re trying their hardest at avoiding work to drive you up the wall.
  • Use your co-workers if you can.
  • Redirect for the positive, do more than catch a student doing the right thing, find reasons to praise them for being good, especially those staff who don’t get along with the student. Reward them honestly. This is probably the hardest part of catching the ‘good’ a student does as well much as being genuine that you’re excited they’re doing great things.
  • Speaking of rewards, as a staff member you really need to pick your battles. Not everything needs to be a fight. Student won’t write in pencil, hand the an erasable pen. Not willing to write notes, “will you copy these notes later?” or, “If I give you a copy of the notes, will you highlight the vocabulary words for the unit?”
  • Realize that staff can be overwhelmed at being shoved away even when they know it’s not personal. Let them take the breaks to walk away from the student, to sit in the hall for a moment and use their own calming techniques so when the battle matters, they know the student may actually listen. Help each other out, give them a shoulder to lean on. As an observer, don’t rush to rescue your co-worker without waiting to hear from them, especially if you might be a preferred staff member.

As a caveat to being that shoulder to lean on: make sure you’re both in a safe place to vent. No other students around and the room isn’t subject to others walking in.

The students are all settling in. It’s going to be a great year. Once you get past these little speed bumps.


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

 

Posted in 8 hours, Begining of the Year, Behavior Strategies, Campus, Disabilities, General Education Teachers, paraeducators, Special Education Teachers, Students | Comments Off on Better Go And Get Your Armor…

A Letter to the Students

Welcome Back! We are so very excited for the 2016-2017 academic school year blog for ParaEducate.

As of a week ago, voting was open for a conference that ParaEducate, The Inclusive Class, and National Board on Full Inclusion, with Sheryll Zellis, and Rob Rummel-Hudson are participating in. Your vote helps our summit get selected.

As always, we’ve prepared a few entries that discuss beginning of the year activities. This year’s first blog was actually inspired by something that transpired at the end of last school year. We had noticed the recent rise of students who were reluctant to receive help and at the end of the year, with the help of a general education teacher, we asked a segment of the youngest grade why they didn’t respect the paraeducators on their campus.

There were some pretty varied and uncensored reasons but the heart of the matter: the students who had been the most troubled by paraeducators were students who had no positive experiences with paraeducators prior to arriving on the campus.

This shocked us a little and immediately we could list the positive interactions that paraeducators on this campus had provided all students, not just the students with disabilities. But that got us thinking about how to intervene this upcoming school year, to provide these students at this particular campus a better sense of what that staff was really about. Not just that the Principal said they were a part of the team. Not just that the teachers said they were as influential and beneficial to the classes they supported, and not just to the specific students they had to work with.

I give you, a letter to read to students.


Dear Students,

You don’t really know me, but I’m a paraeducator. By definition, my job is very specific. In some classes, I may float around a lot and get to meet a lot of you. In other classes, I may have to stay in one place, no matter what, and work with a specific student.

Your previous campus may also have had paraeducators, but here at this campus, we really are a part of your education. We’re here to help you learn. Sometimes learn about students who may think or act quite differently from what you’re used to. Sometimes it’s to help you learn that your voice matters. And sometimes it’s to help you learn that you have staff members on your side.

I am an extra set of eyes in a classroom and in the hall. Yes, sometimes you may ‘get in trouble’ by me. But I did see that other student pick on you, and while you didn’t think I didn’t do anything, I promise you I reported it, I may have also intervened and talked to that student about their behavior. That classmate that has been depressed, I asked them how they were doing today. I want you to know, that you may be in a stage where you wish to disappear into the floor, but I see you and I will get to see you do amazing things this year.

Sometimes I may not do anything to help a specific student or situation, because that’s a part of growing up. You have the right to rise and fall by your own merits. If you don’t know it, I’ve already been in the grade you have been. I’ve sat in that seat, I’ve been the student too shy to raise my hand, I’ve been the student that didn’t know what question to ask first, and I’ve also been that student who didn’t know how to start.

I will be here all year. Myself, and my other paraeducators on your campus are all here for all the students.

Sincerely,

Paraeducator


Do you have any questions about this week’s blog? Do you want to offer a guest blog? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in 8 hours, Begining of the Year, Behavior Strategies, blog, Campus, General Education Teachers, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Students | Comments Off on A Letter to the Students

A Busy Summer 2016

We’re back, for a little while. It’s been a busy summer at ParaEducate.

We just got our copies of the Brookes Publishing Company’s Inclusive Calendar for the 2016-2017 academic calendar right as July started. We are included in this calendar as are tips from us about paraeducators. We’re very honored to be included with The National Catholic Board on Full Inclusion, The Inclusive Class, Think Inclusive, The Sparkle Effect, National Center for Learning Disabilities, National Bullying Prevention Center, Inclusive Schools Network, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education, Removing the Stumbling Block, TASH, and Together We Rock. You can get your calendar free here!

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Calendar from Brookes Publishing, featuring ParaEducate during April and the whole year is filled with information about inclusive education.

But two weeks ago now, we officially approved our new book for publication. Another Just The Words, this time World Geography. In early drafts, this was supposed to be a part of “Finding It In the World”, but due to publishing constraints, it was actually easier and cheaper for buyers to have the two books split, which developed the Just the Words series. Just the Words: World Geography is more than just vocabulary that pairs with “Finding It In the World”, it has grown and been updated including locations and concepts that were not used in “Finding It In the World”. Like all our “Just the Words”, Just the Words: World Geography, encourages the option of either having a student type the words or hand write to work on fine motor coordination depending on the student. The work is meant to be instead of a warm up or notes for a student, giving a time for a student to really look at the material that is being discussed in class.

Final cover of "Just the Words: World Geography"

Final cover of “Just the Words: World Geography”

If you’re interested our complete works are listed as the following available through Amazon.com:

If you’re looking for other materials, check out our TeachersPayTeachers Store or our TeachersNotebook Page. We do have some free materials! Check them out!

Other things we’re preparing: we’re looking ahead at our series for the beginning of the school year. Yes, we agree: we’re not ready for it to start either, just starting to relax over here at ParaEducate. We’ve had some lessons from the end of last school year that just did not fit with the end of the year, and we did want to address the topics at the beginning of the school year, because they merit conversations all academic year.

But there are events coming up on the horizon that are just too good not to share. First of all, we’re pleased to announce that we have partnered with The Inclusive Class for another webinar, date and time being finalized currently. We will be talking about what it means to be including students by case study. The venue will eventually be on YouTube, but more information is coming soon. We will be joined by Beth Foraker of the National Catholic Board on Full Inclusion, Shelley Moore and her book “One Without The Other”, and Antonia Hirson from SpEd Blog. We’re excited and hope you will be too.

As we finish, we’d like to remind everyone to stay hydrated, relax and enjoy themselves, and keep an eye on those early back to school sale bins because you never know if there’s a great fidget or a notebook that can better support a student. School is just around the corner.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? ParaEducate returns for 2016-2017 on August 18. Look for our annual summer blog! Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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End of the Year Wrap Up

We dragged our feet on finishing this blog post. It’s our last one for the 2015-2016 academic year. It’s reliably warm outside on the West Coast. Even the cold snap we had parts of last week haven’t dampened the students’ excitement. Ten days and counting. Less for some districts. Perhaps that’s why our students don’t want to do anything academic. But as much as the distractions of the world are permeating into the classroom, there are still things that require our attention.

While the gauntlet of finals, final projects, text book turn ins, field days, special assemblies, teaching students how to sign year books, teaching students to say ‘good-bye’, teaching students about their next year’s campus, reaching those last milestones, and doing all the normal parts of your job is difficult.

We’ve had a full year at ParaEducate looking at behaviors, paraeducator professionalism, and tips for working with students with disabilities. We’ve traveled, we’ve been a public voice, and we’ve trained. Over the summer we’re working on three to four books. If we get to publishing them this year, we’ll let you know in our summer blog. (Keep checking social media and our blog because it’s an unplanned blog entry!)

Students have surprised us with great things and then some not so great things. We’ve seen a year and grown from that experience. We’ve seen general education teachers learn from the students and the classes they’ve had with students included and grown from that experience and learn how to adapt their assignments. We’ve also learned a lot from teachers who are not as flexible with students with disabilities, from classmates who have needed some introduction to students with disabilities.

And then while you were out on the class picnic, a student was asked to join in the Frisbee game with some of the students without prompting. The students are eagerly talking about their summer plans and when a student offered that he was going to a camp for students with his disability, all the kids in the class wanted to know what that sort of camp was like because they were heading to different camps. All of these things you’ve been able to see because you’ve been invisible and visible.

So before you leave for the year, check for phone numbers you may need from co-workers, make plans to meet up for coffee, thank a co-worker who made your day a little brighter, and say good-bye to your students who are graduating. Know that the work you’ve put in this year has paid off. Stay safe and enjoy your time off.

Whether you stay with your campus, transfer to another campus, or leave paraeducating behind for other career opportunities, ParaEducate plans to return to blogging for the 2016-2017 academic year August 18, 2016.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? ParaEducate returns for 2016-2017 on August 18. Look for our annual summer blog! Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in blog, Campus, Classroom, Conferences, Disabilities, End of the Year, General Education Teachers, Inclusion, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Students | Comments Off on End of the Year Wrap Up

Wait, I know you can do this….

As the end of the academic year approaches, two phenomena happen and no matter how prepared you are, it’s a little startling. The first are the great surprises, the ones where your student who has never done the “thing”, usually something independent, suddenly does the “thing” without prompting or demonstration. That all your work you’ve done has been worth it. And you celebrate. Maybe it’s a big deal to the student and maybe it’s not, but this is what you’re working for. The second, and less elating phenomena is the student who has learned the “new thing” and has successfully demonstrated the “new thing” all year without problem and today, they see the “new thing” maybe for the first time in a while, and they fall apart because this is a “new, new thing”. And you’re standing there stuck because it’s not a “new, new thing”.

The “new thing” could be anything. A social strategy, an academic concept, a self-help activity, a demonstration of independence, or a calming strategy. But the student is breaking over this. There may or may not be a full intervention needed because the student is screaming on the floor.

Sometimes this is an expression of anxiety. The end of the school year can be really hard. The count downs, the special schedules, and unusual activities that have no explanation all contribute to that emotional whirlwind of saying ‘good-bye and see you next year’.

There are also students, both general education and special education, who sincerely believe that now testing is over, nothing matters. This is horribly false, even for the teachers who may not have serious work from now until the last days of school. Truth be known, grades aren’t set into stone until they are turned in. Some students’ grades could easily flex 10-15% depending on the class. Okay some high school classes don’t have that much movement, but for some students, even those who do not seek the golden “A+”, this may mean the difference between passing a class and repeating it one more time. For a student who thinks they might not pass, this is a last chance to do those little pieces to keep things together.

There is also the weather to consider. Whether regular or not, warmer weather has arrived for most of the United States. If not totally arrived, it is on the horizon. The students just want to check out and think about anything but school.

So you have four students all unable to move on right now because one has anxiety, another checked out, a distracted student, and a student who just “can’t.” What strategies work best?

  1. Use a visual schedule. Even if you may have faded, giving this back brings some comfort. It doesn’t have to be a big production, it could just be a sticky note that sits on their desk that reminds them that today they may not have a service or that recess will be shorter.
  2. Help the student work for smaller chunks with more frequent breaks. Be clear that the break is the reward. If breaks aren’t rewarding, try something like a small package of a favorite food item. Whatever the reward really is: it should be quick, should be often as every day, and positive for the student.
  3. Realize that opposite of fading is a privilege. Sometimes, as the anxious student amps up, it’s nice to just sit within their eye sight and let them know you’re there to help them out. This requires none of the normal interactions, it’s just about being a parachute without verbally offering.
  4. Q.-T.I.P. Quit Taking It Personally. That student who didn’t do any work all year, did they really deserve to earn back those five to six points to get them into passing? And for the students who are having a full tantrum, they’re not planning on picking a fight right now. (Unless they are and that’s a different strategy to begin with.)
  5. Go moment by moment. Those special schedules that are breaking up the days are eating into your limited patience reserves. Just don’t look at the whole day. Worry about the bit before lunch and then look at the schedule again after lunch.
  6. Most important of all: enjoy because students are alike with or without disabilities. You never know when an invitation to go do something cool during lunch may come a student’s way or those moments that are real and sincere standing at the end of a long grade level hike at the cliff and being thrilled about the journey looking out and watching the scenery.
  7. Lastly: most important, document the refusal or tantrum to the “new thing” that they’ve been successful at. Either with a comment on a data sheet or setting up a data sheet specifically to track this at the end of the year. Having this may help next year or even help re-evaluate whether or not a student could be ready for the next levels of activities in a specific subject. Most of the time this starts innocently and you think it “may be something else” but suddenly you’ve felt like you’ve been doing this a lot lately. And just getting data helps put it in perspective. You may even be able to enlist the help of an OT for some things.

The end of the year is coming, and the students still need to focus on what is at hand. Though the books may be heading into the library and the technology may be away for the year, the year is going to continue to need the attention of everyone until the final bell.


Next week, we sign off for this academic year! Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in 8 hours, Assembly, Behavior Strategies, Campus, End of the Year, OT, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Students, Support Services | Comments Off on Wait, I know you can do this….

Dear Student Teacher

Before I get too far into this week’s actual blog, we had a wonderful opportunity this week to go off and inspire some future teachers at a major university this week about Inclusion. We were there at UCDavis with Nicole Eredics from The Inclusive Class (Yes, the same person who wrote us a blog in October!) and Beth Foraker of National Catholic Board on Full Inclusion. While Nicole and Beth did most of the talking, sometimes it’s interesting to observe, especially since the observation is the key skill of any paraeducator. While I sat back and observed, I had time to start writing a note, a note I wish I had shared with many of the wonderful student teachers I have made contact with over the years (nearly 20!) in both general education and special education.

But focusing on the general education teachers, is of primary importance not only to raise the expectation to want inclusion in any given campus, but to let the general education teacher know that there will not just be this moment of swimming without help as they start teaching, and especially if they are participating in inclusion.


Dear Student Teacher,

I honestly can’t see all of you right now. I know and respect the amount of energy you have in being here, so maybe I should actually explain a few things. Teaching, at least at the level you’re focusing on completing right now, this is an Olympic Swimming Pool. There may be a diving board at one end, and maybe cameras checking if you really did touch the wall, but this is it. It has definite size, shape, and while large, it is possible to cross to the other side.

Your engagement in the topic of inclusion is critical. You may not have been aware that you may have been doing it a few times already. You may not have been attempting to do ‘something different’. Wanting this, doesn’t help just one student, or a short line of students, it helps all the students. We’ve talked a lot about community and the microcosm of community that are reflected in our schools. We’ve talked a lot about how this is following a law that was written well before the years most of you were born.

Inclusion is simple and complex. It is slightly more than opening the door, but it is not a second less than providing everything you can possibly provide to every student.

I also am all too aware that in your first two years of employment, once you wander away from the institutions, are weighing heavily on your shoulders. That you shall not have time to rock boats and enforce change as we have given it to you. But that doesn’t mean you cannot provide change. It does not prevent you from forging a relationship with a special education teacher that comes to your campus nor the students who may wander past your door, sometimes lost in a sea of other students. Being a willing partner for when the moment is right, or even for that student who no one else thought was “going to do anything”, makes that difference.

There is a lot to learn. And when you’ve learned that, you’ll find for a specific student, you’ll need to learn more. And I hope you remember right now, today, because for two hours, you looked at this reminder of inclusion. It’s not some shiny unattainable ideal. It’s just a part of this Olympic sized swimming pool. And if you remember today, even a little bit, even tomorrow, you’ll find that maybe someone else will be ready to see you practice inclusion because it is the way communities have been working for a while.

Thank you,

ParaEducate


Only two more weeks before we sign off for this academic year! Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. Paraeducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #BetterTogether, Campus, General Education Teachers, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Special Education Teachers, student teachers, Students | Comments Off on Dear Student Teacher