On The Horizon

It’s been a week here at ParaEducate. We’re lucky in our section of California: we didn’t lose power. But that doesn’t mean the weather hasn’t played with the attention of all the things we’ve needed to accomplish. The weather has affected working with students, working with the things we need. Fortunately, the weekend is nearly here.

Where Have We Been?

This isn’t a post about the blog going somewhere or ParaEducate coming back from somewhere. This is a post about history.

It’s the middle of October, one of several months dedicated to a variety of disabilities. We aren’t here to quibble over the phrasing of ‘awareness’ verses ‘acceptance’. We’re here to look at how far we’ve truly come.

A bit of truth-telling we need to share—Renay has been on a professional detour of sorts and hopefully will be making something we need to really delve into this history project we are about to embark on.

We promise this is worth waiting for.

Wait…Isn’t There Supposed to be a Book Announcement?

ParaEducate has been working on a very special book for three years. Of which, in the last five months there was a complete re-write. Not a partial edit, a completely new file was started and built around the original project.

The book is currently in multiple pieces being reassembled and sorted through. It involves some intensive illustration and not all of the original art pieces are quite ready. We’re almost there. We promise. You’ll be the first to know.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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Teaching With Training Wheels

Renay was out doing data sheets this week, her life seems to have returned to the world of data. She was working on some data from a student teacher, trying to wrangle the instructions and provide the students she supported with help.

Student teachers are fun. They’re young, they’re hopeful, they mostly are cool.

There are some things we need student teachers to know and appreciate:

  • We know your time to work with the students you’ve selected for your projects is limited. We appreciate you getting your feet wet and figuring things out. Watch us before you start your data or your approach. While the student may have never hit another person, we saw their hands clench when you bent down close. We saw the look of disdain in their eyes when you asked for their eyes. We said nothing, partly because you need to be aware of these things and partly because we did not want to undermine your burgeoning authority.
  • Data Sheets need to be simple. Yes, the goal should be there, but what symbols, numbers or tracking? Be concise on the way we should gather information. Our job is to do our best to follow your instructions.
  • It took us years to learn too: prompts to correct students need a minimum of 20 seconds before offering up another prompt or choice. And do not creep up on the student.
  • You can be wrong. And we will smile and take it. But let us show you a few tricks, we’ve taught a few student teachers as much as a mentor teacher.
  • Take a moment to appreciate the fact that while one (or two) teachers are signing off on your work in the program, you’ve got at least one other professional keeping an eye out for your well-being.  
  • Get organized now. Not later. Not next year. Everything goes into a specific folder. Be ready for things to get lost. Make copies. Print extras. Find the system that works for you now. You’ll thank us later.
  • Ask about the acronyms. We’ll shout them at you as we run down the hall…we know most of them. The ones we don’t know, we’ll ask someone else.

You can be wrong. And we will smile and take it. But let us show you a few tricks, we’ve taught a few student teachers as much as a mentor teacher.

ParaEducate

Student teaching is a very unique place in a professional career. Some have more information about tactics than others, and it’s your job to share the wealth, not just sit down and be in awe of a good, or a team that is learning to find the skills to work together. Don’t worry you’ll get the hang of it before your next term sends you somewhere else.

October Is Busy

October is literally one of the most celebrated packed months for people with disabilities.

October is:

  • ADHD Awareness month
  • Down Syndrome Awareness Month
  • Dysautonomia Awareness Month
  • National Dyslexia Awareness Month
  • Spinal Bifida Awareness Month
  • Occupational Therapy Awareness Month
  • October 6: World Cerebral Palsy Day
  • October 15: White Cane Awareness Day
  • October 13-19: Invisible Disabilities Week
  • October 13-19: International OCD Awareness Week

Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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By the Month

Things have finally settled into a routine. There are a lot of bolts that need tightening as September leaves all those early days as a far memory. Approaching October things to remember that behaviors to encourage include asking for help when a student needs it. October is about knowing that the student always does not have a pencil when they come to class.

  • October is the reminder to students that they have choices.
  • October is the reminder that there are consequences for those choices (grades).
  • October is the reminder to wait before going in to help students without being asked.
  • October is the reminder to look beyond behaviors to find the things you like about the student.
  • October is the reminder to appreciate modifications.
  • October is reminding the student that you believe they can do the things they believe they cannot do.
  • October is the reminder about really getting into the groove and working things out to make the best year possible.

You aren’t winning the battle by taking the hills with students. You’re winning the battle of making a difference with a student with patience and perservance — the same skills we want all our students to demonstrate eventually.

You’re winning the battle of making a difference with a student with patience and perservance — the same skills we want all our students to demonstrate eventually.

ParaEducate

The memo your principal normally doesn’t send

Participate in the spirit week. Sure, you might forget the thing every day, but try a few of them. Yes, we found a jersey we can wear to work, or the tie-dye shirt, or the crazy socks. (Okay maybe not the socks, they need to be washed again.) It isn’t lost on the kids that you’re participating. Maybe consider dressing up with a cape on superhero day. You know the blanket with clothespins on the shirt like you were still three years old. The kids appreciate it. As do the other adults. Having fun together at work is contagious, it makes the hard days easier. A campus that is supportive for both students and staff is a world of difference for the campus community as a whole.

By the way…

October means that Inclusion From Square One will be publishing again. We’ll let you know when they’re going to run their stories.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #BetterTogether, 8 hours, Behavior Strategies, Campus, Disabilities, Inclusion From Square One, paraeducators, Professionalism, Reframing, Students | Comments Off on By the Month

Two Roads…

We’re going to let you in on a little secret. Renay’s least favorite poem is Robert Frost’s poem, “Two Roads Diverged…” However, she worked past that disdain for this week.

“I don’t have a disability.”

Whether it comes in a moment of exasperation or a moment of clarity, at some point, many students with disabilities come to this point and state, “I don’t have a disability.” Especially if they need help with their academic work. For the side of the adult, this brings about a lot of thoughts.

Are we too physically close? Did we give too many instructions? Who has been making fun of the student? What brought this about? Does the student know?

But at that moment, the real question is, “What do I tell the student?”

There are ways to be proactive before the question ever comes around. Special education teachers can start by opening the door and talking with the students on their case about their disability, the official name, the fact that their disability has patterns that make certain things difficult for that student. This would also be useful if this conversation came in preparation for the student’s IEP.

Some pitfalls: the family not wanting the student to hear their reason for the IEP.

Take on the question at the moment?

  • Really truly, proceed with caution.
  • Do not feel obligated to talk to the student then and there. You can simply state, “I am sorry you seem frustrated.” or you can ask, “Why did you make that statement” But don’t read too much into it. Report back to the case manager, no matter what you chose to do.
  • Did you read the first statement?
  • Have a coworker present if at all possible.
  • Be factual about the way their disability presents itself. “When you get anxious, you get a break and your teacher might not always see that you need a break.”, “Your mind has trouble when you hear directions, my job is to write the instructions down for you to see them.”, “You have trouble seeing the board, my job is to make sure you have the handouts enlarged.”, “I’m coming around and asking students if they need help, but I am especially asking you right now what you understand.”
  • Tell the case manager this happened.

Some students may truly not need help. Observing from the back of the classroom, having a clear line of sight to that student may truly be enough. Letting the student know that you’re there to help is very useful, and even when they ‘don’t get it’, they know they have space to try and find methods to figure things out.

While we are on the subject of proximity…

It’s that annual reminder, while some students require that you are within an arm’s reach for health or specific need, try and step away from students and give them space. Let the student make a mistake. Let the student drift off and be off task for a few minutes – what? Their peers are most definitely daydreaming, tired, stressed, or otherwise, just like the student with a disability. They may just hide it better.

Their peers are most definitely daydreaming, tired, stressed, or otherwise, just like the student with a disability. They may just hide it better.

ParaEducate

One more thing…

Speaking of proximity: If you need to vent about a student and their behavior, be sure to do it without the student around. If the student appears, take that deep breath and let it out slowly. Drop the venting right then and there. Get yourself into the space to work with the student. Don’t keep talking about the behavior. You are the professional.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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What To Do vs. How To Do It

We were going to leave last week’s post in the dust and move on, but then Renay had a week talking about sub[statute] binders.

We talked about sub binders in our book in detail but we also talk about it on the road when we talk about the organization that special educators need.

However, this week, Renay was working with one team and the staff was busy putting together this list of their week on a table. While Renay is an advocate for a table to sort information, the amount of information every person was trying to cram into the table was starting to get a little crazy. Then Renay asked the team, “Are you describing what you personally do in your job or are you telling someone how to do your job?” The staff all stopped. The tables looked busy. No one could get enough information in, even the ones who typed.

In the sub binder the absolute, non-negotiable:

  • Hourly schedule of where to be, who to expect, breaks
  • A map of the campus
  • The campus emergency protocols
  • What to do when you’re where

It would be nice to know exactly how to be you, but that fact negates your uniqueness and relationship with the students and other staff. It would also be really great to have this information all on one page, but the little notes about how to best work in a room with staff, tricks to get students to follow instructions when they know someone else is new doesn’t fit on one page. But be direct, brief, and positive for your replacement if you’re at a district that has substitutes.

It would also be really great to have this information all on one page, but the little notes about how to best work in a room with staff, tricks to get students to follow instructions when they know someone else is new doesn’t fit on one page.

ParaEducate

While We Are Talking About Subs

Substitutes: you are about to perhaps take on a temporary job that might end up being your honest job interview. We know that this job was probably not what you wanted. This job is also probably the most dynamic of all the things you have done to date. Try your best. We know your understanding of what one person does day in and day out is complicated by just the nuances of what will happen in the day. Yes, we were serious about the interventions to behaviors. We are sorry you had to anticipate the readings in a subject that is your least favorite. Thank you for covering for us. We hope to be back soon.

One more thing…

We were contacted by a state today that we haven’t visited before. But as for the state by state resources in the United States for paraeducators, it’s a little empty out there. Due to the nature of education being mostly the domain of the states, each state handles paraeducators, paraprofessionals, instructional aides, or that extra adult in a classroom a little differently. Even within a state, the job title and expectations are very different.

We will have a list of general resources, but we have been working on a state by state resource for a while. Give us a little while. We’ll talk about this soon.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #BetterTogether, Campus, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Professionalism, substitutes | Comments Off on What To Do vs. How To Do It

Juggling Backwards

A friend of Renay’s posted a song about partner dancing. This reminded her of the old question about dancing– who was better Ginger Rogers or Fred Astaire. To which the answer is generally subjective, but then the most ardent arguers will point out that ‘Ginger Rogers had to do it [dancing] backward in heels.’

We not saying that all paraeducators across the country are female either. While a great percentage tend to be female, many are male and they provide a much-needed role model in education for many students.

The Mind of a ParaEducator

The mind of a veteran paraeducator is cluttered. Not to discount the mind of a newly hired paraeducator—it’s cluttered as well. But there are different types of clutter.

Both have to remember:

  • Schedules and all the variations
  • Not just their schedule of where, who, and activity, but the schedule of whoever may be working next with a given student
  • The schedule of the bells for the grade for the day
  • The assembly schedule that shifts everything over by twelve minutes
  • The schedule of rotation for the classroom activities
  • The route to the nearest bathroom
  • The number of total minutes breaks were skipped
  • Known strategies to calm down a student
  • The phone number for the office
  • The procedures in case of student health need
  • The homework for all the classes
  • How to work the copy machines
  • Where the paper for the copy machines is kept
  • How to get graph paper when they need it
  • The fact that a student with a disability is probably the most observed person in the room and that their behavior shouldn’t be any better than their peers
  • The student ID number of the students supported for the cafeteria
  • Speaking of the cafeteria, the dietary restrictions of students for health or religious reasons
  • The thirty-eight side notes another person has passed on
  • The fact that a student has a loose tooth
  • The fact that another student has lost their tooth and is tucked in the backpack
  • A student typed a full sentence unsupported early this morning
  • That their shin hurt from where the soccer ball was caught
  • The sound a volleyball makes when bouncing off a person’s head (especially when that head is your head)
  • That the end of the school day is a wonderful moment
  • All the IEP due dates that are coming in the next few weeks
  • Who doesn’t like chocolate on staff and who is allergic to nuts
  • Where to find that modification made four years ago
  • Why a student doesn’t wear their glasses and which student broke their glasses today
  • Where the new tubes of toothpaste are for the students who have braces
  • And most importantly: when Friday is

And you want to know something: this doesn’t even scratch the surface of all the things.

But a paraeducator also has to remember:

  • How to get help if they don’t know what to do both in their professional and personal lives
  • Which entrance to the office has space where they can take a moment
  • Where the best place to relax on campus is on your lunch
  • Who the best person is to help when you’re feeling stressed

And you want to know something: this doesn’t even scratch the surface of all the things.

ParaEducate

The year is most definitely started. We hope you take the time to remember that you do know a million little things and that all the cogs don’t have to stay working to make progress. Take care of yourself. Then take care of the job at hand.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #TeamInclusion, 8 hours, Behavior Strategies, Campus, Disabilities, General Education Students, paraeducators, Professionalism, Students | 1 Comment

Trailing Off Some Quick Thoughts

Interrupted…

We just have to say a really nice interaction with a local police department. Renay’s car was subjected to theft last week and while ultimately: she knows she’s never going to get her gear back, the officers that responded to take the report were professional and we appreciate their efforts.

But not out…

Renay was observing a new inclusive placement for three students who were not previously included. While the placement is still out, she is currently working with the case manager and the general education teacher for a modified curriculum for these three students.

Of highlight: she was struck by how much more serious two of the students take this subject matter. In the follow-up class, a support class, the students enjoy having the textbook to refer to. While previously, students had references, the act of transferring the material for the students is new and currently driving their desire to attempt the material. Arguably, the third student is still so stunned to be with peers, we aren’t really certain that the student understands that less will be expected of them than their peers, but they need to attend a class anyway.

Didn’t you get the memo…

The beginning of the year has nearly pulled a rug out from all of us. Between Renay’s new commuting schedule and the fact that demands feel very different this year, we think we might have even skipped last week’s blog posting.

We will post on Thursdays. We just cannot promise regular intervals of postings.

Moments that last in the heart…

We are also going to take time for a little personal story. Two of Renay’s godsons started Kindergarten this year, within weeks of each other. The joy of doing something each boy viewed as ‘grown-up’ was written on their faces in the early morning drop off photos. And then the afternoon photos of one of the boys in his car seat heading home slumped over catching a nap.

But this reminds of us of all our students. Those with and without disabilities. It’s not just Kindergarten. It’s not just those milestones. That first day, even when the student knows routine could possibly be waiting for them, that first day has sounds, sights, things that make their minds process that cannot possibly all be accounted for. That student that decided they weren’t going to walk anywhere else today sat down on the ground and refused to budge for any reward. That student that ran out of the classroom right before snack just really needed to get up and move. That student who is already pushing behavior buttons, may not understand that the adults around them care.

The hurdles of switching tasks can be difficult for many students. Use visual schedules. Prompt visually. Avoid overwhelming students with spoken instructions. Wait for the general education teacher to cue from, you share the student’s progress.

Especially those first-week reminders…

Be direct about choices for a student. A student you’re more familiar with might joke that they won’t do the work, and it might be something that sets you off. How about responding, “Sure you cannot do the work and you can get the grade you earned for that work.” The student you don’t know is stuck on missing a comfort item at the wrong time of the day? “I can see you really need that item right now, but right now we have two choices of how to move on without the item. I can tell from your tone and your body language that you really need that item so we can see what we can do about it later.”

Take that deep breath. Close your eyes for a moment and listen to the bell. Watch the flag on the quad flutter in the breeze. Support one another as professionals. The school year has just begun.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in #kindness, #TeamInclusion, 8 hours, Begining of the Year, Behavior Strategies, blog, Campus, Co-teaching, Disabilities, General Education Students, Inclusion, ParaEducate, paraeducators, Professionalism, Reframing, Students | Comments Off on Trailing Off Some Quick Thoughts

Opening the 2019-2020 Academic Year

Returning From Summer

We are honored to be back. But we need to let our regular readers know that ParaEducate is undergoing some structural changes. We are going to post on Thursdays we know, but after the Beginning of the Year check-ins, we’re likely to cut back on our weekly posts. Part of the reason: the team has different demands, and the other part, because of the summer we’ve had this year, we are publishing our new book later than usual so we would like the time to complete and make the book finalized. We thank our followers for understanding while we make these temporary changes.

Speaking of Returning…

We’re back! We know many districts have already started their academic formal year. We publish the blog during the regular academic school year on Thursdays in North America.

Passion (for education)

The word “passion” has come up a lot lately in some conversations. Success comes through passion—love for the process of education. Without passion, life simply is. And Renay can count the number of teachers she feels are successful because of their passion for teaching.

But paraeducators are often not passionate people. They fall into the education world sometimes on purpose but a handful fall into education by accident. And it is passion that may keep them there.

Passion is different for every professional. Sometimes it’s honest caring and kindness for students and other times passion is a lot harder to discern.

Passion is nebulous to some educators. But it has clear boundaries. Passion is more about acceptance of the tasks at hand and not the fear of drudgery, though drudgery is expected from time to time. It’s an adult making progress in smaller increments with students that may not be expected. Passion very simply is knowing that your job is to give and give a little bit more, even when it isn’t asked of you.

We will say that many educators give a lot, and then give that much more. And we know it can lead to burn out. But if you have passion, you know that your reason for being there is always going to keep you returning.

New Year, New Start

While we have you here, we would like to remind folks to make it clear to students, especially students with behaviors that often net the student a visit to disciplinary channels that every year is an entirely new start for that student. We do know that behaviors follow patterns, but privately talking to the student before they even set foot that every day they have many choices to make that we hope that student makes the choices that help keep the student in the class, engaged with their peers, and making academic progress as well as social progress.

We Get A Lot of Push Back Sometimes

It isn’t just behaviors, we also connect with maybe a student can try and read a very short paragraph aloud in class. Even with general education teacher support. This usually makes some of our students unhappy, being held accountable in class. But it is also a moment to give the student a chance to realize that they have learned something over the days they’ve been in class.

As an educator working with a student with a disability, it is all too easy to walk in that first day and look at those early assignments and state right away, “[The student] is not doing [the assignment].” Try a little bit, even if you’re sitting right there with the student. Back away when they manage to put their name on the paper. See if peer cues get the student’s attention. Give the student some space.

  • Yes, even if they run away.
  • Yes, even if they have a health concern.
  • Yes, even if you still don’t know a lot about them.

We said space. Not leave the student and go to a whole other job. And while they have space, you should be observing, waiting to see where frustration starts to peek, what skills the student relies upon to try and attempt the more difficult process. Space also is the time to think when they need to process. And yes, the students will make mistakes.

Let the 2019-2020 academic year be the year of space and mistakes, and new starts. If you’re a new paraeducator, welcome. If you’re a veteran, welcome. We are a resource for all.


Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in 8 hours, Begining of the Year, Behavior Strategies, blog, Campus, Disabilities, General Education Students, General Education Teachers, ParaEducate, paraeducators, peers, Students | Comments Off on Opening the 2019-2020 Academic Year

Not the Summer We Had Planned

We want to say first of all, it was not a bad summer on our part. It was just the type of summer that got away from us.

We are in progress to publish. We suspect that we will announce the next book in the Fall, but we shall see. What happened? We opened the manuscript we’ve been cultivating for two years and then scrapped every single page except the dedication page. This means that all the illustrations got shifted, and some are under revision to work with the artwork we originally started. On the plus side, we had originally anticipated this new book would be over 400 pages; the revision brought the book down to fewer than 200 pages.

It’s been almost seven years since we’ve gone to a summer conference, but we got the chance to go to Lawrence, Kansas, for KU SOARS. KU SOARS is a summer session driven mostly to the Masters of Education students but parents, self-advocates, and others all participate in the three days of  break outs, cooperative learning, and help new educators walk away with a plan to approach educating all learners. We were quite honored to be at KU SOARS and can’t wait to hear how those educators are doing in the near future.

We were quite honored to be at KU SOARS and can’t wait to hear how those educators are doing in the near future.

ParaEducate

Renay also has the privilege of working with a Social Emotional Learning program this summer. This is not an easy summer program to help kids who struggle already connect with some

We return with regular blogs on August 15. We are working out some details, but we may change from a weekly blog. We still want to connect with new ideas for the new academic year, but due to pushing our publishing later this year, we will really need to look at what we will need to say in the upcoming weeks.

Have you seen our other resources?

Renay is our connection through www.inclusionfromsquareone.com . If you’ve not seen it, take some time. This July, we connected with a few self-advocates. Inclusion From Square One will run another month in the near future.

We know the days of summer are precious, but now Back to School Sales are around the corner.

We are taking part in the TPT sale, use the code, BTS19 for up to 20% off all products August 6th and 7th all day.

We thank you for your support. We look forward to connecting with you all for the 2019-2020 academic school year. See you August 15!


ParaEducate, the blog, is returning for the 2019-2020 academic school year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

Posted in Conferences, Modifications, ParaEducate, SEL, Summer, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Not the Summer We Had Planned

Counting Stars

We know some districts are now officially done for the school year. Renay says she envies you just a bit.

There is a sense of relief with the end of the academic school year, as things aren’t winding down, they are just entirely over that the world stops and if you exhale for just a moment you will survive just by that simple first puff of air.

The world kept turning but now it’s time to look at what we really need to say at the end of the year.

We thank the Professionals

For all the ones who stepped up to do additional supervision, the value added moment of connect to students, and the ones who help other professionals on campus out to address behaviors with a specific student, for those who answered the hardest questions, for those who said the hard words, for those who listened, who helped guide new employees into understanding students, and to those who did the thankless jobs that never got recognized.

The job is hard, but we do it together because it builds a community worth coming back to every day. It models better strategies for all students that co-workers collaborate in many different ways daily.

… to those who did the thankless jobs that never got recognized

ParaEducate

We thank the Students

For the ones who had to tell yet another person what their disability really was, beyond what was black and white on a piece of paper, for those that showed us the meaning of one person with a specific disability (or combination of disabilities). We are also thankful to the students without disabilities. You showed your peer patience and truth whenever you interacted. Some of you also demonstrated the process of friendship but most of you did not want to start on this journey at the beginning of the year but you slowly learned and found a way to understand. We also thank the students that made us laugh…Renay was recently asked by a student if she was really “Batman”.

We thank our followers on Social Media

There are hundreds of options to read on the internet when it comes to special education. And we cover a range of information on a weekly basis during the academic school year. And time and time again, our followers share our posts, celebrate with us and let us know when we need to reconsider our point of view.

The thing we need to say

ParaEducate will sign off tonight from the weekly blog until August 15, 2019. We will have one unannounced blog mid summer sometime talking about summer activities we have planned.

Thank you all for a wonderful school year.


ParaEducate, the blog, is done for the 2018-2019 academic school year. Do you have any comments about this week’s blog? Do you have a question for us? Would you like to be a guest blogger? Would you like to have an opportunity to pilot some materials at your campus? Find ParaEducate online herehereherehere, and on our website. ParaEducate is a company interested in providing materials, information, and strategies for people working in special education inclusion settings for grades K-12. ParaEducate, the blog, is published weekly during the academic school year on Thursdays, unless a holiday. ParaEducate shares their findings at conferences, through their books, and their academic adaptations.

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